Articles related to buying or selling your home

New Year, New Home? Set Homeownership Goals Whether You’re Buying, Selling, or Staying Put

 Sunday, January 3, 2021     Marion Goard     Financial Health House and Home Real Estate Market Buying and Selling

Featured Photo

The start of a new year always compels people to take a fresh look at their goals, from health and career to relationships and finance. And now, with historically low mortgage rates, increased home sales and price growth and a tight housing inventory, the time is right to also make some homeownership resolutions for 2021.

Home buyers, is this is the year you work to improve your credit score, pay down some debt, or save for a down payment?

Home sellers, I've laid out plans for you to get top dollar for your property, including timing of your home sale, making your property stand out from the crowd, and investing in your extra living space.

Even if you're staying put for a while, homeowners, you can resolve to improve your status quo by evaluating your home budget, finalizing your home maintenance schedule, or maybe investing in a second property.

So no matter your home ownership status, below are some ideas and advise for you to make this year your best one yet. Read on to learn more.

HOME BUYERS

Resolution #1: Qualify for a better mortgage with a higher credit score.

Your credit report highlights your current debt, bill-paying history, and other key financial information. Importantly for your home-buying journey, it is also used by lenders and companies to calculate your credit score, which partly determines if you are qualified to obtain a mortgage. Therefore, before you start house-hunting, make sure your finances are in the best possible shape by checking your credit report and credit scores, available directly from Equifax and TransUnion.

Your credit score will be a number ranging from 300-900. Generally speaking, a credit score of 725 or higher is considered very good to excellent. If your score drops below 725, you might need to work at boosting your score for a few months before you begin house-hunting. Ways to do this are to pay your bills on time every month, keep your credit card balances low, and avoid applying for new credit.

Resolution #2: Improve your credit health by paying down debt.

Do you have student loans, credit card debt, or car payments tying up your income each month? That debt is hurting your 'buying power,' or the amount of home you can afford. Not only is it money that you can't spend on your new home, your debt-to-income ration also affects your credit score, which is discussed above. The less debt you have, the higher your score and the better mortgage you can obtain.

If you can, pay off some debt in its entirety - like a low balance on a credit card. Then apply that 'extra' money you previously paid on that credit card to pay off bigger debt, like a car loan. Even if you can't pay off all (or any) of your debt in full, reducing the balance of each account will help you qualify for the best possible mortgage terms.

Resolution #3: Create a financial safety net before applying for a mortgage.

Don't forget that buying a home requires some cash as well. This down payment depends on the home's price, but the minimum is 5% for a purchase price under $500,000, and closing costs range from 2-3%. You'll also need money for moving expenses and any initial maintenance tasks that might pop up. And as the pandemic taught us, you never know when an unforeseen event might cause a job loss, drop in income, or health scare, so having some liquid savings will ensure that you can still pay your mortgage if a crisis occurs.

Dedicate some effort to building up your reserves. Cut down on unnecessary expenses, and consider having a portion of each paycheque automatically deposited into your savings account to avoid the temptation to spend it.

HOME SELLERS

Resolution #4: Decide on the right time to sell your home.

In a typical year, spring is when home sales spike in Canada. This might be the best time to take advantage of the price increase predicted by the Canadian Real Estate Association, which says, "The national average price is forecast to rise by 9.1% in 2021 to $620,400."

But sales price isn't the only thing to consider. You might not be ready to sell your home yet because you don't want to uproot your kids during the school year or because you need to tackle some minor upgrades before placing your home on the market.

This means that there is no one month or season that is the perfect time to sell you home. Instead, the right timeline for you takes into account factors such as when you'll earn the highest profit, personal convenience, and whether your home is even ready to put on the market. A trusted real estate professional can talk you through your specific needs to clarify when to sell you home.

Resolution #5: Boost your home's resale value by making your property shine.

Housing inventory is at historic lows across the country, and that means the market is fiercely competitive. Selling your home in 2021 has the potential to net you a huge return right now and you can maximize that amount with some simple fixes to make sure your property outshines your neighbours for sale down the street.

In your home, you might need to tackly a minor remodelling project, such as upgrading the flooring or adding a fresh coat of paint. According to one remodelling impact report, simply refinishing existing hardwood floors recoups 100% of the cost at resale, and completely replacing it with new wood flooring recovers 106% of the costs.

Outside, you might consider improving your curb appeal by removing a dead bush, trimming a tree that block the front window, or power-washing your moldy driveway and sidewalks. In fact, real estate agents say cleaning the exterior of you house can add $10,000 to $15,000 to a home's sale price. And improving a home's landscaping may increase its value by 15-25%.

A good agent should provide custom-tailored suggestions to ensure your property pops inside and out. Ask me about my local insider secrets that will make you home stand out from others on the market.

Resolution #6: Invest in your "extra" living space to meet current buyers' needs.

Due to COVID-19, more people are staying at home to work, go to school, exercise, and stay entertained. And these lifestyle changes are showing up in home buyer preferences. For example, according to one study, buyers are looking more and more for homes with formal, outfitted home offices, private outdoor spaces, and updated kitchen appliances.

So if you've got an underutilized room, consider turning it into an office, home gym, schoolroom, or multi-purpose room to meet current home buyer needs and attract better offers on your home. Got some underwhelming space outside?  You could turn it into an outdoor entertainment area by adding a firepit, upgrading the patio furniture, or installing a grilling area. Be sure to consult with a local real estate professional before investing in a renovation, however as each market's buyers have different tastes.

HOME OWNERS

Resolution #7: Evaluate your household budget to reflect financial challenges.

After this past year, in particular, your financial picture may have changed. Maybe you were furloughed, had your hours reduced, or got a new job further from home. Perhaps you've kept the same job, but you're now working remotely. A work-from-home arrangement could mean less money spent on gas, tolls, a professional wardrobe, and dining out for lunch.

But this could also mean new (or increased) expenses now that you're working at home, such as new tech-related purchases, faster WI-FI, and higher energy bills. January marks the perfect opportunity to update your income and expenses and review last year's spending habits, tweaking as needed for 2021.

For more specific ideas, contact me for my free report "20 Ways to Save Money and Stretch Your Household Budget."

Resolution #8: Save money now (and earn more later) with a home maintenance plan.

Having a schedule of regular home maintenance projects to tackle will save you money now and in the long-term. You'll avoid some surprise 'emergency fixes,' and when you're ready to eventually sell your home, you'll get higher offers from buyers who aren't put off by overdue repairs.

Even if nothing necessarily needs fixing right now, you can lower you energy costs by maintaining and upgrading your home. For example, consider upgrading some features to ENERGY STAR high-efficiency products. You could save up to 45% in energy costs if you change your outdated windows.

For a breakdown of home maintenance projects to tackle throughout the year, contact me for my free report "House Care Calendar: A Seasonal Guide to Maintaining Your Home."

Resolution #9: Invest in real estate for a better standard of living.

Even if you don't plan on leaving your current residence, real estate is a great way to improve your quality of life in 2021.

Have cabin fever from the long quarantine? A vacation home in a getaway location you love lets you safely spread your wings. And if you've been looking for a second stream of income, an investment property might be your answer. Just be sure to consult with a real estate professional to get a realistic sense of a property's true income potential.

Want more information on how a second property fits into your 2021 plans? Request my free report, "Move Up vs Second Home: Which One Is Right For You?"

LET ME HELP YOU WITH YOUR 2021 GOALS

Without a plan and a support system, 73% of Canadians will break their new year's resolutions. Whether you're looking to buy, sell, or stay put in your home, it helps to connect with a trusted real estate agent to keep you motivated and on track.

As a local market expert, I have the knowledge, experience, and network to help you achieve your home ownership goals. whatever they may be. Reach out to me today for a free consultation and commit to a happy and prosperous new year.


1588 Kerns Rd. Unit 1 - Burlington ON - SOLD

 Monday, November 30, 2020     Marion Goard     House and Home Real Estate Market Buying and Selling Just Listed

Featured Photo

Welcome to Unit 1, 1588 Kerns Road.  There's over 1500 sq. ft. of living space in this well maintained and updated 3 bed, 3 bath, split-level end unit townhouse in Burlington's Tyandaga Mews, a mature townhouse complex complete with a swimming pool and party room.

The bright and spacious primary bedroom suite features a sitting area with gas fireplace, walk-in closet, 3 pc en-suite bath and private balcony. Walk-out from living/dining room combination to your private outdoor space with large stone patio. Or sit back and relax in the generously sized family room with a contemporary gas fireplace.

The basement provides for an office/den space plus tons of storage. There's hardwood flooring in living/dining, kitchen, main and upper hall plus 2 of the bedrooms. New broadloom has been recently installed in the primary bedroom and family room. The unit has been freshly painted throughout. All this and more - a great location close to shopping, GO Transit and easy highway access.

Perfectly suited for first-time home buyers, a young family, professionals or empty nesters.

MLS Date - Friday December 4, 2021.  Visit www.unit1-1588kerns.ca for details and more pictures.

Offers accepted anytime!

Don't miss out. Make this one yours!

Contact Marion to arrange your private showing.

List price:   $689,900

# Rooms (above grade): 5

Bedrooms:  3

Bathrooms: 3

Size: 1342 sq. ft. (above grade)

Garage:  Double  /  Double Private Drive

Basement: Partial / Large Crawl Space for Storage

Taxes: $2700

Condo Fee: $390/month (till mid 2021)

        

  


The New Normal: A Strong Housing Market Expected to Continue into 2021

 Sunday, November 8, 2020     Marion Goard     Financial Health House and Home Real Estate Market Buying and Selling

Featured Photo

Circumstances like a once-in-a-hundred-years pandemic and historic inventory shortages might have made you assume that the housing market would lose steam, but there is plenty of evidence to the contrary. As Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) senior economist, Shaun Cathcart noted, “records [are continually] being broken” in the residential property market.

FEWER LISTINGS EQUALS A SELLER’S’ MARKET

Inventory, meaning the number of homes for sale, is at a record low across the country. 

According to statistics from RBC Economics, the majority of Canada is experiencing tighter demand versus supply conditions than the country has seen in nearly two decades. At the end of September, there were just 2.6 months of inventory on a national basis. That restricts supply, which increases prices if demand remains unchanged. In terms of the local market, at the end of the October in Burlington, there was less than 1 month supply of inventory listed for sale. Hamilton had even less inventory. 

Fewer listings creates a housing market that is advantageous for sellers for several reasons. For one, buyers have to act fast to snap up available homes. Across the country, the median number of days listings now spend on the market is 26 days. The stats for October 2020 indicate the average number of days on market in Burlington was 17.1  

Another benefit is that sellers are enjoying higher net returns on their listings. This is thanks to the tough competition for homes, which often results in bidding wars between buyers. The average price of a home sold on the Canadian Real Estate Association's (CREA’s) MLS service went for a record $604,000 (17.5% more than last year). Continued home-price growth is anticipated for the remainder of the fourth quarter, and the median national home price is expected to rise 7% over last year.

This sellers’ market is not simply a product of the pandemic. In fact, Cathcart cited the steady decline in home inventory over the past five years—not COVID-19—as the cause for higher prices. “Heading towards records and record type conditions was something that we had already expected for 2020,” he said. This means that even if construction was to ramp back up, buyers can’t simply wait for things to go back to normal before re-entering the market. Rather, all signs indicate that this is the new normal.

Indeed, rather than a slowdown, we are continuing to experience a surprisingly robust real estate market across the country. And experts estimate that these conditions are likely to last into the new year. TD Bank Group Economist Rishi Sondhi predicts that high home prices will persist for the rest of 2020. 

Market conditions like fewer available listings, changing criteria for desired homes, and record-low mortgage rates are changing the way people buy and sell homes, most likely in a lasting way. But this sustained activity, even in the uncertainty that is 2020, proves Canadians still view real estate as a sound investment. The only question now is how you can take advantage of the housing market’s “new normal.” In this article, I’ll explain everything you need to know to achieve your goals.

What It Means for Homeowners: These higher home prices show that buyers are willing to spend more on a    home right now than they did last year. So, if there ever were a time to list for top dollar—and expect to receive asking price quickly—that time is now. Ask me for a free consultation of your home’s value today.

What It Means for Homebuyers: Due to low inventory, buyers could easily find themselves in a bidding war. Time is of the essence in a seller’s market, so you’ll need to get your financing in order and be pre-approved for a loan before you begin your home search. I can connect you with a trusted mortgage professional to get you started.

BUYERS BENEFIT FROM LOW MORTGAGE RATES AND A BIGGER PLAYING FIELD

Don’t worry, homebuyers. This “new normal” of real estate has benefits for you too. 

For example, people used to base their next home purchase on how far the commute was to work or in which school was preferred. But now, thanks to the pandemic shifting the locus of jobs and work, they are free to consider what they need from a home to make it a place they really want to work, teach, exercise, cook, and live.

Often, this equates to needing more space in different types of areas. The search for these criteria is driving residents out of densely populated metropolitan areas and into the suburbs. This exodus from cities is good news for buyers: it opens up more possibilities for inventory that they could not have considered pre-pandemic.

Another advantage for buyers is the record-low mortgage rates. The average five-year fixed rate fell to a record low of 1.99% in September, down from 3.04% at the end of 2019 and 3.74% at the end of 2018.

Thanks to these rates, buyers are afforded the opportunity to buy much more home than they could before. Consider this example. If a buyer can afford a $500,000 home by putting $120,000 down (25%), the monthly payment on a standard 25-year mortgage would be $2,210. Conversely, with a lower rate (say, 2.8%) that buyer can now afford a $600,000 home—$100,000 more purchasing power—at a cost of only $12 additional per month.

The good news is that interest rates are not expected to rise anytime soon—and may hover at these record lows until 2023.

What It Means for Homeowners: If you’re locked into a higher fixed-rate mortgage for the next several years, you’re probably wondering if it’s a good idea to refinance. With those additional funds, you could even choose to invest in a second home in a new desirable location. Reach out to me for a referral to trusted mortgage professionals. 

What It Means for Homebuyers: The time is now to determine how much home you can comfortably afford and make a plan to find it. We can set up a search for you to find homes that best meet your new needs, even if they’re in neighborhoods you wouldn’t have considered before.

A RECORD-SETTING YEAR FOR HOME SALES IS JUST THE BEGINNING

Despite the seemingly adverse buyer conditions, 2020 experienced a record-breaking number of home sales. According to CREA, home sales activity jumped 46.5% year-over-year in September. With an additional 20,000 transactions logged, it was the busiest September thus far. Moreover, “many Canadian housing markets are continuing to see historically strong levels of activity as we enter into the fall market of this very strange year,” CREA chair Costa Poulopoulos said in a statement.

Part of the reason for these continued sales is that the pandemic has created a paradigm shift in the patterns of real estate. For example, housing needs are typically resolved by late summer and early fall to coincide with the commencement of the new school year. With home-schooling and remote work, however, buyers have been freed to continue their home search into the traditionally slow winter months.

Another reason for the robust market is that household savings grew to 28.2% of household income during the pandemic, an extraordinary level that Statistics Canada said the country has not seen since the 1960s. Canadians who were able to keep their jobs, as well as those on unemployment, have evidently made growing their savings a priority. And it seems as though Canadian home-buyers are using that cash on real estate. 

All this indicates that the housing market is in a strong position heading into the new year. So though it looks different than it ever has before, it’s clear that consumers consider real estate to still be a good investment. The coming months should provide more clues about the market’s direction in the year ahead, such as whether low interest rates and changing housing needs can keep demand levels high, or whether the exhaustion of pent-up demand will cool things off.

What It Means for Homeowners: It’s tempting to believe that homes will basically sell themselves in a market like this. But we’re still seeing properties that are overpriced and under-marketed sit unsold. I can help you optimize the process of selling your home so you can get the best possible offer.

What It Means for Homebuyers: Preparation is key to success in a sellers’ market like this, but don’t let yourself become paralyzed. I'm here to answer your questions and offer sound advice to guide you through all the options that are available to you.

I'M HERE TO GUIDE YOU

National real estate numbers can give us a pulse on the market, but real estate happens in our own backyard. As your local market expert, I can help you understand the finer points of the market that impact sales and home values in your own neighborhood.  

If you’re considering buying or selling a home before the new year or in early 2021, contact me now to schedule a free consultation. We’ll work together to develop an actionable plan to meet your goals.


5 Secrets Buyers and Sellers Must Know About Virtual Home Tours

 Sunday, October 4, 2020     Marion Goard     House and Home Buying and Selling

Featured Photo

For years now, virtual home tours have helped real estate buyers far and wide find the perfect home. From long-distance buyers, to investors expanding their portfolio, to homeowners looking for a vacation getaway, this technology makes finding a house that’s a bit out of driving distance much easier. And for real estate agents, virtual tours have been a useful way to help buyers with their home search and to assist sellers in creatively marketing their listings.

Because of the pandemic, virtual home showing options recently experienced a huge spike in popularity. One survey found that nearly 33% of recent home tour requests were for virtual tours, as compared to just 2% pre-pandemic. It's easy to see why.

Buyers want to quickly find their next safe haven, one that may need to serve as their office, gym, and even classroom for months to come. And sellers want to limit the number of strangers in their home, yet still have the ability to reach enough potential buyers to get the best offer on their property.

Virtual home tours are the popular thing right now, but that doesn’t automatically mean they’re the only option for your home-buying or selling experience. In this post, I’ll reveal five important secrets behind the virtual real estate scene. Read on to learn how they impact today’s home buyers and sellers.

SECRET #1: Virtual Tours Have Evolved

Lots of real estate professionals who had never used virtual tours before were forced to quickly adapt when the pandemic struck. Because of restrictions on time and resources, not everyone is able to create what would have been deemed a “virtual tour” last year. So instead, we’ve expanded the definition of the phrase by creating innovative new ways to show homes while keeping our clients safe and socially-distanced. Here are some terms you might come across as you explore homes with virtual tours.

Traditional virtual tours use 360° Photos, which are images that allow you to see all angles of a space. These are what allow virtual tour viewers to look up, down, and all around the interior and exterior shots of a home. Using a software program, 360° photos can be stitched together to create a digital model that looks like a dollhouse. This is called a 3D Tour. Sometimes agents will also add Virtual Staging, which decorates rooms with digital furniture and accents like wallpaper or paint.

Traditional virtual tours allow you to click to move from room to room in the home, but Online Walk-throughs feature the actual action of walking around. Either the photographer or the agent (depending on factors such as time and safety requirements) will create a video by holding their camera or smartphone and simply moving through the home.

Online Walk-throughs can be filmed in advance or happen live. If they are live, they can also be referred to as Virtual Showings or Online Open Houses. A Virtual Showing is often a scheduled, one-on-one event that mimics an in-person tour of the home, in which the agent and viewer start at the exterior and move their way through the property. If your agent offers to FaceTime or Skype you from a home you’re interested in, for example, that would be a type of Virtual Showing. In contrast, an Online Open House is more free-form, allowing more viewers to pop in and out of a group video call on apps such as Facebook or Zoom.

SECRET #2: Virtual Doesn’t Mean Impersonal

All these styles of virtual tours showcase the property’s details better than static photos ever could. But for a purchase as intimate as your next home, details like a new refrigerator or the size of the master closet aren’t the only deciding factors. Luckily, virtual tours are exceptional tools for personal connection.

As a prospective buyer, virtual tours give you a feel for the property, inside and out, so you can easily picture yourself in the space and decide if the home’s flow and features work for your lifestyle. Live video walk-throughs with the real estate agent will give you insights on those crucial non-visual aspects, like creaky floors, super-fast internet speed, and neighbourhood dynamics. Plus, you’ll be able to ask questions and get an insider’s perspective on what’s so great about the home.

For sellers, if your agent recommends using a virtual tour to market your home, you could attract more buyers. You can also be sure that those interested buyers are still getting the up- close and personal look inside your home that will inspire their strongest offers.

SECRET #3: Virtual Is Just The First Step To Safe Home Sales

Despite the variety of virtual tours available, some buyers will still need to visit a home themselves in order to feel confident enough to submit an offer. In this situation, listing agents and sellers will work together to come up with a procedure that ensures everyone feels safe and comfortable. Some recommendations include requiring interested buyers to present a pre-qualification letter, conducting tours only by appointment and with essential parties, and asking buyers to self-disclose whether they have COVID-19 or exhibit any symptoms.

The day of the in-person tour, agents might ask buyers to remain in their vehicle until they arrive at the property, and to wear protective gear such as face coverings and gloves. Many will provide hand sanitizer and will ask buyers to refrain from touching any surfaces in the home. Instead, the agent (or seller, prior to the buyers’ arrival) will turn on lights, open doors, and pull back curtains. Then, after everyone has left, the agent will return the home to its original state and disinfect it as needed.

SECRET #4: The Speed of Closing Depends on Your Goals

Though maybe not literally, virtual tours are opening doors for both buyers and sellers in terms of options available to them. In 2019, buyers viewed an average of 10 homes over a period of 10 weeks before submitting an offer but thanks to an increased prevalence of virtual tours saving them driving time, they’re able to peek inside that number of homes in a much shorter period to make their final choice.

With all this viewing activity, it makes sense that sellers whose listings feature virtual tours are receiving more offers on their properties. According to one study, virtual tours can add betweentwo and three percent to the sales price of a home, in part because increased buyer interest has made sellers feel confident waiting for the exact right offer.

Remember thought that if you’re a buyer luxuriating in viewing homes from your couch you’re not alone in your search. Your competition is virtually viewing the same properties you are, so it’s still important to work with your real estate agent to quickly submit a strong offer when you find the home of your dreams. And for sellers, if a speedy sale is important to you, carefully weigh that against the temptation to entertain more and more offers, which can keep your home on the market up to six percent longer. Your agent can help you decide the right strategy for your priorities.

SECRET #5: Virtual May Not Always Be the Right Choice

Creating, editing, uploading, and marketing virtual tours for a listing can be pricey. Packages through popular 3D imaging platforms like Matterport and Immoviewers can cost hundreds of dollars on their own.  Virtual staging will further bloat a listing’s marketing budget, and then there’s the advertising dollars needed. Even seemingly inexpensive options like video call walk-throughs still require time and energy on behalf of both the seller and agent.

These costs mean that a full virtual tour package might not always be the right choice for sellers. When you talk to your agent about marketing your home, it may be that an elaborate virtual tour, showing, and open house just don’t make sense. It could be that your potential buyers may not resonate with that type of marketing, that the investment-to-return ratio isn’t in your favor, or that there are more effective ways to get your listing seen by qualified buyers.

Buyers, you may notice that some listings within your search parameters don’t offer virtual tours. That’s because those for-sale homes might not have needed a full virtual marketing package to entice buyers to submit offers, or those homes are better marketed through more traditional tactics. Don’t close the door on your dream home because it doesn’t have virtual events and features. Stay open-minded so you can consider the wealth of home options that fit your lifestyle, needs, and budget.

ARE VIRTUAL HOME TOURS IN YOUR FUTURE?

As technology develops, it will become easier and less expensive to create virtual tours. Coupled with the high demand for them, this means that virtual tour options are likely not only here to stay, but will continue to grow into a common addition to listings.

If buying or selling a home is on your mind, I’d be happy to discuss how virtual tours can play a part in your real estate experience. Reach out to me today for help finding local homes for sale that have virtual tours, or to chat about if adding a virtual tour to your upcoming listing is the right fit.


Letting Go Of The "Stuff"

 Wednesday, September 16, 2020     Marion Goard     House and Home Buying and Selling

Featured Photo

If you’ve lived in the same home for a long time, you have very likely accumulated a lot of “stuff”. Like most people, over the course of a lifetime we collect a myriad of items: furniture, trinkets, books, china, silverware and other treasures. When you are preparing to move, especially if you are downsizing, you will be faced with the question of what to do with everything. This is a difficult choice, and one that most of my senior clients face when they are ready to make a lifestyle change and move from the home in which they raised their family to a smaller home, condo or retirement residence.

THE HISTORY OF YOUR THINGS

We form emotional attachments to the things with which we surround ourselves. For most people, the items in our homes have deep and meaningful memories attached to them. Glance at anything in your home and you can remember where you acquired it, or when, or who gave it to you. This is particularly true for figurines. If you have a large collection and you know your new home will not have the space for all of them, how do you choose which ones to let go?

The same holds true for everything you love. It’s impossible to give up the wooden spoon with the scorch marks slashed across its bowl that houses the memory of your youngest child learning how to cook. The Royal Doulton or Portmeirion tea cups with matching saucers reminds you of afternoons sipping tea with your sister. The heavy wooden coffee table may be the first piece of furniture you and your spouse purchased as a couple. These items hold joy for us, packaged neatly in our family history and our memory. It’s not an easy feat to let things go and it can be painful to release these items and to imagine them living in someone else’s home or worse, the dump.

HOW TO CHOOSE

The first step to sorting out what will move with you is to decide what you absolutely cannot live without and which items hold less of an attachment. If you know the dimensions of your new home, spend some time figuring out which items you wish to keep, but will not fit. Once you’ve done that, it’s time to approach your family and ask them what, if any, items they’d be interested in taking. Ideally, you can keep the heirlooms in the family, but you need to be prepared to hear that the items you hold dear have no value to anyone else. Young people are generally not very interested in anything from “grandma’s house”. Acknowledge that your items hold meaning for you, but someone else will not share that sentiment.

HOW TO DISTRIBUTE

Aside from handing off your things to family members, there are various ways to distribute the stuff you have to leave behind. Before giving away anything, you should assess what items have actual value. Auctioneers, appraisers and other experts can assess your items and tell what has financial value and is desirable on the market. They can also help you re-home those items and will sell them on your behalf for a commission.

Any items that are not sellable can be donated to various organizations. There may be some limits or restrictions on what an organization can take, so it's best to check beforehand. Which organization will take what may also be location-dependant. For example, Goodwill in one area may take furniture, while another will not. Some charities will gladly schedule a pick-up, while with others you may have to find a way to get your items to them. Give some thought to smaller organizations such as church groups or service clubs (like Optimist or  Kiwanis) that might be able to pick up your items and re-home them.

WHERE TO GET HELP

As a Master Accredited Senior Agent, I can walk you through the process of downsizing and offer some guidance on how to determine what you’d like to keep. I have a growing list of experts who can assist you with the valuation and distribution of your goods, as well as packing up your home and unpacking at your new home. The most important thing is to recognize that you had your enjoyment from the items you are letting go and it’s okay to free them to have a new life. It is possible to detach yourself from the items while still holding on to the memories and joy they brought you. If you need further assistance with downsizing, please reach out to me. I can help you manage this process and connect you with the right people who will make this transition a little easier.

As we shift from a trash economy to a repurpose economy, the list of organizations who will distribute your unwanted items continues to grow. Here is a list of resources.

Habitat for Humanity Halton-Mississauga

Habitat for Humanity will take everything from household items to tools to clothes. Items are sold in their ReStore which funds the administrative side of Habitat's organization. All donations to Habitat directly fund the building of affordable homes. They will pick up items, salvage ones that might otherwise go to the dump and have recently launched a Revive program.

Downsizing and Moving

Downsizing and Moving is a 3rd Generation Family owned and operated company who will sort and organize everything in your home and ensure they are either set aside and placed in designated areas for moving, selling, recycling or disposing. They deal with a vast majority of people and organizations that accept all kinds of goods. Their goal is to divert anything away from the landfill.

Sell This For Me

Serving Toronto, Oakville, Burlington, Mississauga, and Waterloo, Sell This For Me will auction your goods in an estate sale. They can come to your house, take photos of the items for sale and list them online or house them at another location to sell.

MaxSold

MaxSold sells items by online auction. This is another easy solution as they will come to your house, take photos of the items for sale and list them online. There is an Ontario Horseshoe branch serving the Horseshoe region. 

Aldershot Lions Club Garage Sale

Located in Burlington, the Lions Club will send someone to your home to determine what they'll accept and will pick up and deliver to the store to sell to others.

Goodwill

Accepts all manner of goods: household items, furniture, kitchen wares, books. Almost anything you want to give away, Goodwill is happy to take. They do not offer pickup service, so you will have to drop off donations on your own.

 

You can also check with your local library branch to determine if they are willing to take donations of books.

 

Consignment sales:

Zoey's Consignment

Millionaire's Daughter (Hamilton and Oakville)

Kerr Home Decor

Bogart Home & Decor Consignment

Downsizing Solutions

 

Service Providers:

Estate Concierge

Neat Spaces

Organize Me Please

Move Seniors Lovingly

The Company of Organizers

 

Facebook groups:

Too Good to Dump 

The link will take you to the Oakville and surrounding areas page, but there are various cities, towns and villages with their own Too Good to Dump Facebook pages.

As always, I'm happy to help in any way I can. Please don't hesitate to call or text me at 905-330-5201 or email mariongoard@kw.com.

 



Testimonials

  Marion kept me informed about all the activity regarding the possible sale. She was always willing to help in making phone calls etc.

Henry Mimee, Burlington, ON

Read More Client Testimonials